Tonic

Glenn Ne-Roi, Jo Mellor Stuart, Neva Hosking, Nina Waring, Rosie Wells, SAARA138
EXHIBITION  RUNS
   
February
   
1
 -  
February
   
12
Tonic is a group exhibition of emerging artists whose practices seek to challenge conventions within their fields. 

INFORMATION

tonic

ˈtɒnɪk/

 

noun

·      something with an invigorating effect

 

To drink a tonic is to consume a medicinal substance to give a feeling of vigour.

Tonic is a group exhibition of emerging artists whose practices seek to challenge conventions within their fields. The artists’ willingness to question and redefine is refreshing. Like taking a sip of tonic water.

Jo Mellor-Stuart seeks to garner and renew interest in defunct industrial landscapes in and around Broken Hill. Her digitally rusted fabrics are stitched and gathered which allow its shape to be dictated by the feminine act of stitching.  Her works emulate the detail of the natural rust patterns found on abandoned mining structures in Broken Hill.  

 

Glenn Ne’Roi’s series challenges the role of photography and documentation. His series examines the effect of staged documentary photographs, as fictions by presenting photographs that appear evidential while providing the knowledge that it is fictitious. Ne’Roi uses photography as a mode to question the way in which we visualise, receive and pose truth. 

 

Neva Hosking seeks to pay homage to the craftsmanship of etching printmaking. Her use non-traditional materials such as plaster and concrete seeks to redefine the print as an object by transforming the physicality of the two-dimensional. Fragmentations and imperfections are embraced as a reflection of the limitations of human memory.  

 

Nina Waring’s ‘Good Boys, A series’ explores the divide between high and low culture. By using gang motifs as decorations placed upon the surface, Waring seeks to reconcile the separation by drawing together delicate and powerful forms.

 

Rosie Wells’ sculptures explores how memory, fact and fabrication can exist when limitations are placed and an image is present but cannot be seen. Her work references monuments through the tall column-like form of the sculptures with traditionally sized 4 x 6 inch photographs placed on top. Her work seeks to remember the forgotten era of tangible photographic keepsakes.

 

SAARA138’s photographs investigate the continuous advancement of image-capturing technologies to be driven by a human fear of becoming obsolete. SAARA138’s photographs are taken by accident and each contains errors due to technological process. Through each of the step taken to produce the image are the potentials for mishaps to transform the image that reflects the artist’s hand.

tonic

ˈtɒnɪk/

 

noun

·      something with an invigorating effect

 

To drink a tonic is to consume a medicinal substance to give a feeling of vigour.

Tonic is a group exhibition of emerging artists whose practices seek to challenge conventions within their fields. The artists’ willingness to question and redefine is refreshing. Like taking a sip of tonic water.

Jo Mellor-Stuart seeks to garner and renew interest in defunct industrial landscapes in and around Broken Hill. Her digitally rusted fabrics are stitched and gathered which allow its shape to be dictated by the feminine act of stitching.  Her works emulate the detail of the natural rust patterns found on abandoned mining structures in Broken Hill.  

 

Glenn Ne’Roi’s series challenges the role of photography and documentation. His series examines the effect of staged documentary photographs, as fictions by presenting photographs that appear evidential while providing the knowledge that it is fictitious. Ne’Roi uses photography as a mode to question the way in which we visualise, receive and pose truth. 

 

Neva Hosking seeks to pay homage to the craftsmanship of etching printmaking. Her use non-traditional materials such as plaster and concrete seeks to redefine the print as an object by transforming the physicality of the two-dimensional. Fragmentations and imperfections are embraced as a reflection of the limitations of human memory.  

 

Nina Waring’s ‘Good Boys, A series’ explores the divide between high and low culture. By using gang motifs as decorations placed upon the surface, Waring seeks to reconcile the separation by drawing together delicate and powerful forms.

 

Rosie Wells’ sculptures explores how memory, fact and fabrication can exist when limitations are placed and an image is present but cannot be seen. Her work references monuments through the tall column-like form of the sculptures with traditionally sized 4 x 6 inch photographs placed on top. Her work seeks to remember the forgotten era of tangible photographic keepsakes.

 

SAARA138’s photographs investigate the continuous advancement of image-capturing technologies to be driven by a human fear of becoming obsolete. SAARA138’s photographs are taken by accident and each contains errors due to technological process. Through each of the step taken to produce the image are the potentials for mishaps to transform the image that reflects the artist’s hand.

FEATURED  WORKS

Glenn Ne'Roi

Jo Mellor-Stuart

Neva Hosking

Rosie Wells

SAARA 138

Nina Waring

OTHER  EXHIBITIONS