The ARTIST in TIMES of WAR

MARK VISIONE
EXHIBITION  RUNS
   
June
   
21
 -  
July
   
2
The works function as responses to the attitudes of artists to war historically and particularly in an Australian context. Here they question the linking of the ANZAC tradition to national identity and consider if a broader perception of that idea of what it is to be Australian might not be more appropriate for this avowed multicultural society.

INFORMATION

The works exhibited represent a significant part of the studio component of a PhD in Visual Arts at Sydney College of the Arts (The University of Sydney) and were made in conjunction with a written thesis, the studio and written elements informing each other. The works function as responses to the attitudes of artists to war historically and particularly in an Australian context. Here they question the linking of the ANZAC tradition to national identity and consider if a broader perception of that idea of what it is to be Australian might not be more appropriate for this avowed multicultural society.

Concepts such as the inevitability of war and that sense of progress exclusively owned by Western culture are questioned. Ultimately, war is proposed as being a phenomenon that significantly impacts civilian societies – noncombatants, infrastructure, culture and future potential – rather than a tragedy played out purely by those in uniform. 

The exhibited works were made using intaglio techniques developed by the artist during a career of many decades. They were made and printed in the print-media department of the Sydney College of the Arts. Each work is a unique state rather than part of an edition. 

 

Mark Visione.

Mark Visione was born in Sydney, Australia (1953), but spent most of his adult and professional life in Europe, living in the Netherlands and Italy. Perhaps this is the origin of that perception of differing attitudes towards war and peace found in Europe and Australia. He returned to live permanently in Australia in 2012. He feels part of the print-making community of both Australia and the Netherlands.

His work has been exhibited internationally and is found in private and public collections.

Most recently, a cycle of his works representing the Dutch WWII diarist Etty Hillesum was exhibited in various venues in the Netherlands. A selection of those works has been included in this exhibition.

The works exhibited represent a significant part of the studio component of a PhD in Visual Arts at Sydney College of the Arts (The University of Sydney) and were made in conjunction with a written thesis, the studio and written elements informing each other. The works function as responses to the attitudes of artists to war historically and particularly in an Australian context. Here they question the linking of the ANZAC tradition to national identity and consider if a broader perception of that idea of what it is to be Australian might not be more appropriate for this avowed multicultural society.

Concepts such as the inevitability of war and that sense of progress exclusively owned by Western culture are questioned. Ultimately, war is proposed as being a phenomenon that significantly impacts civilian societies – noncombatants, infrastructure, culture and future potential – rather than a tragedy played out purely by those in uniform. 

The exhibited works were made using intaglio techniques developed by the artist during a career of many decades. They were made and printed in the print-media department of the Sydney College of the Arts. Each work is a unique state rather than part of an edition. 

 

Mark Visione.

Mark Visione was born in Sydney, Australia (1953), but spent most of his adult and professional life in Europe, living in the Netherlands and Italy. Perhaps this is the origin of that perception of differing attitudes towards war and peace found in Europe and Australia. He returned to live permanently in Australia in 2012. He feels part of the print-making community of both Australia and the Netherlands.

His work has been exhibited internationally and is found in private and public collections.

Most recently, a cycle of his works representing the Dutch WWII diarist Etty Hillesum was exhibited in various venues in the Netherlands. A selection of those works has been included in this exhibition.

FEATURED  WORKS

Mark Visione, Breakdown (Beckmann in Wervicq), 2016. Drypoint (with dremel) and collagraph , 98 x 75 cm. 

‍Mark Visione, Náufragos, 2017. Collagraph, chin collé, drypoint and overprinting, 98 x 76 cm. 

‍Mark Visione, Prayer, 2015. Collagraph and etching, 39 x 49.4 cm.  

‍Mark Visione,The Horseman, 2015. Collagraph, 50 x 50 cm. 

Mark Visione, The Invader,2015. Collagraph, 50 x 50 cm. 

Mark Visione, Op de Hei (On the meadows), 2015. Collagraph 39.2 x 98.5 cm. 

OTHER  EXHIBITIONS