God Told Me So, To My Face

Amy Carkeek
EXHIBITION  RUNS
   
November
   
23
 -  
December
   
4
God Told Me So, To My Face examines the consequences of aspiring to the manufactured ideologies produced through consumer imagery and objects.

INFORMATION

God Told Me So, To My Face examines the consequences of aspiring to the manufactured ideologies produced through consumer imagery and objects. These representations have been constructed through popular culture, and are embedded in our consciousness and beliefs from early childhood. At the heart of these consumer desires, lies the photograph and its powerful ability to influence, persuade and commodify. The domestic decorative ornament —unassuming and unresponsive —seemingly has no function or purpose other than for aesthetic pleasure.  Through the modification of the once loved and mass produced ceramic figurines, the works seek to disrupt the intended innocent, unthinking, and obedient characters to produce a dark and disturbing alternative. In stylistically photographing them, both a cognitive dissonance and a new veneer are produced, revealing the deception while also re-commodifying it.

 

BIO

 

Amy Carkeek’s photographic practice explores the impact of popular culture and consumer imagery upon the construction of Western society’s outdated and unattainable façade. Carkeek seeks to depict the cracks in this veneer as she questions the motivations of a system that promotes and accepts the continual commodification of all aspects of life through the construction of the photograph.

God Told Me So, To My Face examines the consequences of aspiring to the manufactured ideologies produced through consumer imagery and objects. These representations have been constructed through popular culture, and are embedded in our consciousness and beliefs from early childhood. At the heart of these consumer desires, lies the photograph and its powerful ability to influence, persuade and commodify. The domestic decorative ornament —unassuming and unresponsive —seemingly has no function or purpose other than for aesthetic pleasure.  Through the modification of the once loved and mass produced ceramic figurines, the works seek to disrupt the intended innocent, unthinking, and obedient characters to produce a dark and disturbing alternative. In stylistically photographing them, both a cognitive dissonance and a new veneer are produced, revealing the deception while also re-commodifying it.

 

BIO

 

Amy Carkeek’s photographic practice explores the impact of popular culture and consumer imagery upon the construction of Western society’s outdated and unattainable façade. Carkeek seeks to depict the cracks in this veneer as she questions the motivations of a system that promotes and accepts the continual commodification of all aspects of life through the construction of the photograph.

FEATURED  WORKS

Amy Carkeek, Little boy blue, 2016, archival inkjet print, 90 x 130 cm

Amy Carkeek, We shall meet in the place where there is no darkness, 2017, archival inkjet print, 45 x 30 cm

Amy Carkeek, Come play with us, 2017, archival inkjet print, 45 x 30 cm

Amy Carkeek, Children should be seen and not heard, 2016, archival inkjet print, 45 x 30 cm

Amy Carkeek, See no evil, hear no evil, 2017, archival inkjet print, 45 x 30 cm

Amy Carkeek, I'm your worst nightmare come true, 2017, archival inkjet print, 45 x 30 cm

OTHER  EXHIBITIONS