Euclidean Form

Ingrid Siliakus, Gloria McGrath, Eun Ju Cho with courtesy Handmark Gallery, Nicholas Jones, Curated by Pearl de Waal and Mahsa Foroughi
EXHIBITION  RUNS
   
March
   
29
 -  
April
   
9
Euclidean Form brings together local, national and international artists and architects who investigate form in relation to Art and Architecture. 

INFORMATION

Euclidean Form brings together local, national and international artists and architects who investigate form in relation to Art and Architecture.

Sharing their appreciation for organic fibers, these artists re-evaluate, cut, fold, deconstruct or bend paper into new limits.

Form in Art connotes something that is three-dimensional and encloses volume, having length, width, and height. Form competes with shape, two-dimensional or flat. Form is a shape in three dimensions and can be geometric or organic.

Form in Architecture can be read as a structural form of utilitarian nature that supports the building’s or structure’s space. Form may be a perceptual one related to the articulation of surfaces. Form can pertain to sensory perception and experience. A conceptual or logical form orders the elements as well as regulates the material form.

Advanced mathematical theories play a fundamental role in the creation of three-dimensional forms that extend to traditional Euclidean geometry. These algorithms map out mathematical space into diagrams with distinctive angles whether drawn from complex repeating arrangements found in nature or abstract concepts that determine spatial order.

 

Exhibiting artists:

Ingrid Siliakus, Amsterdam

Gloria McGrath, Sydney

Eun Ju Cho with courtesy Handmark Gallery, Hobart

Nicholas Jones, Melbourne

Euclidean Form by Mahsa Foroughi

 

In a hunt for shelter, humans turned into nature, occupying seemingly shapeless caves. But there were hidden forms in all primaeval settlements. And, once humans discovered nature’s secret, they built and occupied more space and built the most complex forms. They turned their back to nature and embraced it once more. They created the architecture of Baroque and Rococo. They folded and unfolded form in search for beauty.

Mathematics has never been left out of the aesthetical reckoning. Kepler’s Fibonacci Sequence, the da Vinci’s Vitruvian Man, and Leibniz’s polymath that constituted the grounding elements of a Baroque, all are examples of a quest for a form. A form that can lift humans psyche that can move us to the realm of beauty.

Ingrid Siliakus’s series of folded form draws us back to a multiplicity of the world of immanence. Fragmented is an impulse of a black and white world, where the spirited virtue trapped in the darkness. One cannot trust the simplistic surface of Reflejar as it is pregnant within. Equinox shows the beauty of fold, the term that Deleuze once established as “a model for expression in contemporary aesthetics,” the concept that illustrates the dynamics of space, movement, and time.

Gloria MacGrath’s Euclidean forms draw us back to the ancient worlds of Greek. Plato’s Cave is the pyramid of thought, an illusion of shadows. Indeed, we all are prisoners of the cave who see shadows reflected on the wall from objects passing in front of a fire behind them. A true artist is a freed-up foremost prisoner. She goes beyond the cave to realise that the shadows on the wall are not reality at all. So, does our Euclidean world?!

Nicolas Jones’s books represent a hole in our knowledge. Whether we now Goethe or we’d only read the sides of his epic and lyric poetry? Whether Goethe’s ‘Full Moon Rising’ Shines within the page of an old book of him? Eventually, whether we are living in a world of the words or the words take us to the zone of the forms; Tupper is mocking our knowledge our true sense of understanding.

Eun Ju Cho’s works anecdote another story. They are the embodied version of Malevich’s Black Square. They talk about the abstract movement. A dot that moves to become a line, a line that paralleled to create a space, a space that, no matter how ifinite, become enclosed to frame the whole. The series; Reflecting on Lines and Windows, challenge the usual form of window. They are the dynamic of lines and colours. They sometimes turn into a subtle metaphor of prisons’ window and another time a peaceful piece of a farm window. They are abstractions, dynamics, and Euclidean Forms that speak of radical geometry although simple, although tranquil.

 

About Mahsa Foroughi

Mahsa is an Architect and a Poet. She is near completion of a PhD at the Griffith University, Gold Coast, Australia and writes extensively on architecture and philosophy.

In 2014, she was awarded the Graduate Scholar Award at The Fifth International Conference on The Image for outstanding achievement with an active academic interest in the conference area. Apart from her academic experience, Mahsa has worked with several cultural institutions in Sydney, including Carriageworks and the Museum of Contemporary Art, and more recently at the National Institution of the Dramatic Arts.

‍‍EUN JU CHO, REFLECTING ON LINES AND WINDOW , 2017, BALSA, SILK AND WATERCOLOUR, 20 X 20 CM

Pearl de Waal

Independent early career curator

 

Masters candidate in Museum & Heritage studies, University of Sydney

UNSW Art & Design alumna, University of New South Wales

 

M: 0414 206 220

W: https://pearldewaal.wixsite.com/website

L:   https://www.linkedin.com/in/pearl-de-waal-5a6b07101

Pearl de Waal - Independent Early Career Curator - Pearl de Waal | LinkedInwww.linkedin.comView Pearl de Waal’s profile on LinkedIn, the world's largest professional community. Pearl has 4 jobs listed on their profile. See the complete profile on LinkedIn and discover Pearl’s connections and jobs at similar companies.‍

Euclidean Form brings together local, national and international artists and architects who investigate form in relation to Art and Architecture.

Sharing their appreciation for organic fibers, these artists re-evaluate, cut, fold, deconstruct or bend paper into new limits.

Form in Art connotes something that is three-dimensional and encloses volume, having length, width, and height. Form competes with shape, two-dimensional or flat. Form is a shape in three dimensions and can be geometric or organic.

Form in Architecture can be read as a structural form of utilitarian nature that supports the building’s or structure’s space. Form may be a perceptual one related to the articulation of surfaces. Form can pertain to sensory perception and experience. A conceptual or logical form orders the elements as well as regulates the material form.

Advanced mathematical theories play a fundamental role in the creation of three-dimensional forms that extend to traditional Euclidean geometry. These algorithms map out mathematical space into diagrams with distinctive angles whether drawn from complex repeating arrangements found in nature or abstract concepts that determine spatial order.

 

Exhibiting artists:

Ingrid Siliakus, Amsterdam

Gloria McGrath, Sydney

Eun Ju Cho with courtesy Handmark Gallery, Hobart

Nicholas Jones, Melbourne

Euclidean Form by Mahsa Foroughi

 

In a hunt for shelter, humans turned into nature, occupying seemingly shapeless caves. But there were hidden forms in all primaeval settlements. And, once humans discovered nature’s secret, they built and occupied more space and built the most complex forms. They turned their back to nature and embraced it once more. They created the architecture of Baroque and Rococo. They folded and unfolded form in search for beauty.

Mathematics has never been left out of the aesthetical reckoning. Kepler’s Fibonacci Sequence, the da Vinci’s Vitruvian Man, and Leibniz’s polymath that constituted the grounding elements of a Baroque, all are examples of a quest for a form. A form that can lift humans psyche that can move us to the realm of beauty.

Ingrid Siliakus’s series of folded form draws us back to a multiplicity of the world of immanence. Fragmented is an impulse of a black and white world, where the spirited virtue trapped in the darkness. One cannot trust the simplistic surface of Reflejar as it is pregnant within. Equinox shows the beauty of fold, the term that Deleuze once established as “a model for expression in contemporary aesthetics,” the concept that illustrates the dynamics of space, movement, and time.

Gloria MacGrath’s Euclidean forms draw us back to the ancient worlds of Greek. Plato’s Cave is the pyramid of thought, an illusion of shadows. Indeed, we all are prisoners of the cave who see shadows reflected on the wall from objects passing in front of a fire behind them. A true artist is a freed-up foremost prisoner. She goes beyond the cave to realise that the shadows on the wall are not reality at all. So, does our Euclidean world?!

Nicolas Jones’s books represent a hole in our knowledge. Whether we now Goethe or we’d only read the sides of his epic and lyric poetry? Whether Goethe’s ‘Full Moon Rising’ Shines within the page of an old book of him? Eventually, whether we are living in a world of the words or the words take us to the zone of the forms; Tupper is mocking our knowledge our true sense of understanding.

Eun Ju Cho’s works anecdote another story. They are the embodied version of Malevich’s Black Square. They talk about the abstract movement. A dot that moves to become a line, a line that paralleled to create a space, a space that, no matter how ifinite, become enclosed to frame the whole. The series; Reflecting on Lines and Windows, challenge the usual form of window. They are the dynamic of lines and colours. They sometimes turn into a subtle metaphor of prisons’ window and another time a peaceful piece of a farm window. They are abstractions, dynamics, and Euclidean Forms that speak of radical geometry although simple, although tranquil.

 

About Mahsa Foroughi

Mahsa is an Architect and a Poet. She is near completion of a PhD at the Griffith University, Gold Coast, Australia and writes extensively on architecture and philosophy.

In 2014, she was awarded the Graduate Scholar Award at The Fifth International Conference on The Image for outstanding achievement with an active academic interest in the conference area. Apart from her academic experience, Mahsa has worked with several cultural institutions in Sydney, including Carriageworks and the Museum of Contemporary Art, and more recently at the National Institution of the Dramatic Arts.

‍‍EUN JU CHO, REFLECTING ON LINES AND WINDOW , 2017, BALSA, SILK AND WATERCOLOUR, 20 X 20 CM

Pearl de Waal

Independent early career curator

 

Masters candidate in Museum & Heritage studies, University of Sydney

UNSW Art & Design alumna, University of New South Wales

 

M: 0414 206 220

W: https://pearldewaal.wixsite.com/website

L:   https://www.linkedin.com/in/pearl-de-waal-5a6b07101

Pearl de Waal - Independent Early Career Curator - Pearl de Waal | LinkedInwww.linkedin.comView Pearl de Waal’s profile on LinkedIn, the world's largest professional community. Pearl has 4 jobs listed on their profile. See the complete profile on LinkedIn and discover Pearl’s connections and jobs at similar companies.‍

FEATURED  WORKS

INGRID SILIAKUS, EQUINOX (WITTE VERSIE), 2011, HANDMADE PAPER BOOK, 33 X 15 X 15CM 

INGRID SILIAKUS, REFLEJAR, 2008, HANDMADE PAPER BOOK, 22 X 16 X16 CM

INGRID SILIAKUS, FRAGMENTED, 2007, PAPER, 30 X 30 X 30 CM

  GLORIA MCGRATH, PLATO’S CAVE, 2014, PAPER, 12 X 15 X 15 CM

GLORIA MCGRATH, PARADISE LOST: EXPULSION, 2014, PAPER, 23 X 25 X 25 CM

GLORIA MCGRATH, GEOENGINEER ME, 2017, PAPER, WOOD, GLASS, PLASTIC, WIRE, 80 X 28 X 80 CM

NICHOLAS JONES, GOETHE, 2016, CUT BOOK, 17 X 11 X 2 CM

NICHOLAS JONES, TUPPER, 2016, CUT BOOK, 15 X 12 X 1 CM

‍EUN JU CHO, REFLECTING ON LINES AND WINDOW XII, 2017, BALSA, SILK AND WATERCOLOUR, 20 X 20 CM

EUN JU CHO, REFLECTING ON LINES AND WINDOW XIII, 2017 BALSA, SILK AND WATERCOLOUR, 20 X 20 CM

EUN JU CHO, REFLECTING ON LINES AND WINDOW XIII, 2017 BALSA, SILK AND WATERCOLOUR, 20 X 20 CM

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