Baranasi

Keroshin Govender
EXHIBITION  RUNS
   
August
   
3
 -  
August
   
14
Sydney artist Keroshin Govender grew up in South Africa in the 1980s amidst a plethora of contrasting cultures; sometimes complimentary, sometimes clashing - always vibrant. As a migrant living in Australia, cultural displacement is a recurring theme. While at UNSW Art and Design, Govender focussed on digital media and visual effects which has helped in his creation of surreal landscapes.

INFORMATION

Sydney artist Keroshin Govender presents ‘Baranasi’ - a series of paintings exploring the complex relationship between human beings and fabric. Each work is intended to convey different emotions and expressions, showing how fabric can disguise, protect and seduce. Depending on the colour, material and style in which it is worn, the cloth can change it’s purpose and appearance; whether suggesting nobility, humbleness, chastity, undesirability or virtue.

 

In ‘Baranasi’ that same level of care is given to constructing each fold as to painting the characters. In this way, the stories of these intriguing characters are told via the colour, shape and folds of the fabric. 

 

Saffron is seen as a sacred colour in Hindu culture, representing fire, and by the subject in “Priest” wearing this colour, his status and profession can be assumed. In “Persephone 1” and “Persephone 2” the same woman is drawn but in “1” her fabric is coarse and desaturated whereas in “2” the blue cloth is softer and more alluring thus conveying a different emotion.  

 

Keroshin Govender uses contemporary design processes to create artwork in traditional mediums. Working from photographs, drawings, life models and nature, every detail is meticulously planned and considered. Little is left to chance, particularly when it comes to colour selection which is the highlight of Govender’s captivating pieces. 

Sometimes confronting subjects are turned into art that is visually appealing, allowing the viewer to engage with the subject matter rather than be turned away. Traditional mediums add gravity to the story-telling process and earn more trust from the viewer than contemporary mediums. Portraiture is Govender’s forte and his subjects are handled with respect and integrity. The nobility of human suffering and resilience are other recurring themes in the work.

 

Sydney artist Keroshin Govender presents ‘Baranasi’ - a series of paintings exploring the complex relationship between human beings and fabric. Each work is intended to convey different emotions and expressions, showing how fabric can disguise, protect and seduce. Depending on the colour, material and style in which it is worn, the cloth can change it’s purpose and appearance; whether suggesting nobility, humbleness, chastity, undesirability or virtue.

 

In ‘Baranasi’ that same level of care is given to constructing each fold as to painting the characters. In this way, the stories of these intriguing characters are told via the colour, shape and folds of the fabric. 

 

Saffron is seen as a sacred colour in Hindu culture, representing fire, and by the subject in “Priest” wearing this colour, his status and profession can be assumed. In “Persephone 1” and “Persephone 2” the same woman is drawn but in “1” her fabric is coarse and desaturated whereas in “2” the blue cloth is softer and more alluring thus conveying a different emotion.  

 

Keroshin Govender uses contemporary design processes to create artwork in traditional mediums. Working from photographs, drawings, life models and nature, every detail is meticulously planned and considered. Little is left to chance, particularly when it comes to colour selection which is the highlight of Govender’s captivating pieces. 

Sometimes confronting subjects are turned into art that is visually appealing, allowing the viewer to engage with the subject matter rather than be turned away. Traditional mediums add gravity to the story-telling process and earn more trust from the viewer than contemporary mediums. Portraiture is Govender’s forte and his subjects are handled with respect and integrity. The nobility of human suffering and resilience are other recurring themes in the work.

 

FEATURED  WORKS

Keroshin Govender, Andromeda, 2017, Acrylic on Canvas, 100 x 76 cm

Keroshin Govender, Anchor, 2017, Acrylic on Canvas, 91 x 91 cm

Keroshin Govender, Priest 2016, Acrylic on Canvas, 91 x 122 cm

OTHER  EXHIBITIONS